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Ageing increases reliance on sensorimotor prediction through structural and functional differences in frontostriatal circuits

Overview of attention for article published in Nature Communications, October 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (89th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (80th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
29 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
13 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
78 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
Title
Ageing increases reliance on sensorimotor prediction through structural and functional differences in frontostriatal circuits
Published in
Nature Communications, October 2016
DOI 10.1038/ncomms13034
Pubmed ID
Authors

Noham Wolpe, James N. Ingram, Kamen A. Tsvetanov, Linda Geerligs, Rogier A. Kievit, Richard N. Henson, Daniel M. Wolpert, James B. Rowe

Abstract

The control of voluntary movement changes markedly with age. A critical component of motor control is the integration of sensory information with predictions of the consequences of action, arising from internal models of movement. This leads to sensorimotor attenuation-a reduction in the perceived intensity of sensations from self-generated compared with external actions. Here we show that sensorimotor attenuation occurs in 98% of adults in a population-based cohort (n=325; 18-88 years; the Cambridge Centre for Ageing and Neuroscience). Importantly, attenuation increases with age, in proportion to reduced sensory sensitivity. This effect is associated with differences in the structure and functional connectivity of the pre-supplementary motor area (pre-SMA), assessed with magnetic resonance imaging. The results suggest that ageing alters the balance between the sensorium and predictive models, mediated by the pre-SMA and its connectivity in frontostriatal circuits. This shift may contribute to the motor and cognitive changes observed with age.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 29 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 78 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 1%
United States 1 1%
Unknown 76 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 20 26%
Student > Ph. D. Student 17 22%
Student > Master 12 15%
Professor 6 8%
Other 5 6%
Other 18 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 25 32%
Neuroscience 15 19%
Unspecified 13 17%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 9%
Medicine and Dentistry 6 8%
Other 12 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 17. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 December 2018.
All research outputs
#770,393
of 12,300,125 outputs
Outputs from Nature Communications
#8,699
of 19,787 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#27,816
of 264,818 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature Communications
#1
of 5 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,300,125 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 93rd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 19,787 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 47.3. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 55% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 264,818 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 5 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them