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Extrinsic and Intrinsic Brain Network Connectivity Maintains Cognition across the Lifespan Despite Accelerated Decay of Regional Brain Activation

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Neuroscience, March 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (95th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (91st percentile)

Mentioned by

news
2 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
42 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
33 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
202 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
Title
Extrinsic and Intrinsic Brain Network Connectivity Maintains Cognition across the Lifespan Despite Accelerated Decay of Regional Brain Activation
Published in
Journal of Neuroscience, March 2016
DOI 10.1523/jneurosci.2733-15.2016
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kamen A. Tsvetanov, Richard N.A. Henson, Lorraine K. Tyler, Adeel Razi, Linda Geerligs, Timothy E. Ham, James B. Rowe, Cambridge Centre for Ageing and Neuroscience, Tsvetanov, Kamen A, Henson, Richard N A, Tyler, Lorraine K, Razi, Adeel, Geerligs, Linda, Ham, Timothy E, Rowe, James B, , , Tsvetanov, KA, K. A. Tsvetanov, R. N. A. Henson, L. K. Tyler, A. Razi, L. Geerligs, T. E. Ham, J. B. Rowe

Abstract

The maintenance of wellbeing across the lifespan depends on the preservation of cognitive function. We propose that successful cognitive aging is determined by interactions both within and between large-scale functional brain networks. Such connectivity can be estimated from task-free functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), also known as resting-state fMRI (rs-fMRI). However, common correlational methods are confounded by age-related changes in the neurovascular signaling. To estimate network interactions at the neuronal rather than vascular level, we used generative models that specified both the neural interactions and a flexible neurovascular forward model. The networks' parameters were optimized to explain the spectral dynamics of rs-fMRI data in 602 healthy human adults from population-based cohorts who were approximately uniformly distributed between 18 and 88 years (www.cam-can.com). We assessed directed connectivity within and between three key large-scale networks: the salience network, dorsal attention network, and default mode network. We found that age influences connectivity both within and between these networks, over and above the effects on neurovascular coupling. Canonical correlation analysis revealed that the relationship between network connectivity and cognitive function was age-dependent: cognitive performance relied on neural dynamics more strongly in older adults. These effects were driven partly by reduced stability of neural activity within all networks, as expressed by an accelerated decay of neural information. Our findings suggest that the balance of excitatory connectivity between networks, and the stability of intrinsic neural representations within networks, changes with age. The cognitive function of older adults becomes increasingly dependent on these factors. Maintaining cognitive function is critical to successful aging. To study the neural basis of cognitive function across the lifespan, we studied a large population-based cohort (n = 602, 18-88 years), separating neural connectivity from vascular components of fMRI signals. Cognitive ability was influenced by the strength of connection within and between functional brain networks, and this positive relationship increased with age. In older adults, there was more rapid decay of intrinsic neuronal activity in multiple regions of the brain networks, which related to cognitive performance. Our data demonstrate increased reliance on network flexibility to maintain cognitive function, in the presence of more rapid decay of neural activity. These insights will facilitate the development of new strategies to maintain cognitive ability.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 42 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 202 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 4 2%
United Kingdom 3 1%
France 1 <1%
Hong Kong 1 <1%
Korea, Republic of 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Unknown 191 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 56 28%
Researcher 40 20%
Student > Master 29 14%
Student > Bachelor 13 6%
Student > Postgraduate 12 6%
Other 52 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Neuroscience 58 29%
Psychology 48 24%
Unspecified 22 11%
Medicine and Dentistry 20 10%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 19 9%
Other 35 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 48. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 January 2017.
All research outputs
#268,798
of 11,576,173 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Neuroscience
#725
of 16,980 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#12,548
of 285,206 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Neuroscience
#26
of 311 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,576,173 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 16,980 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.8. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 285,206 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 311 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.